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November 2017

For the Record: Picturing D.C.

November 9, 2017 - March 4, 2018
George Washington University Museum | The Textile Museum, 701 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052 United States
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November  9, 2017 – March 2018 George Washington University Museum|The Textile Museum For the Record: Picturing D.C. is a juried exhibit of 44 original artworks by 25 local artists who have focused on neighborhoods in each of Washington, D.C.’s eight wards. These two-dimensional artworks, created between 1988 and 2017, offer the artists’ interpretations of Howard Town/Pleasant Plains, Burleith, Palisades, Shepherd Park, Ivy City, Buzzard Point, Kenilworth, or Congress Heights. Since its founding in 1894, the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. has…

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February 2018

Lecture: Lisner Auditorium and Racial Justice in D.C.

February 26 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm EST
George Washington University Museum | The Textile Museum, 701 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052 United States

Michael Tune, PhD candidate, George Washington University Department of History; Gayle Wald, professor, George Washington University Department of English Though recognized today as a site of racial progressivism, the story of Lisner Auditorium is one of foot-dragging and institutional reticence, not progressive action. Join graduate student Michael Tune and Professor Gayle Wald in this historical exploration of GW’s largest public venue. This program is part of the D.C. Mondays at the Museum series inspired by the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana…

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March 2018

DC Oral History Collaborative Community Meeting

March 8 @ 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm EST
Southeast Neighborhood Library, 403 7th St SE
Washington, DC 20003 United States

Join the DC Oral History Collaborative at the Southeast Neighborhood Library to learn more about oral history workshops and how you can get involved! About the DC Oral History Collaborative Created in response to a growing need to capture unrecorded Washington history, the DC Oral History Collaborative (DCOHC) documents and preserves the stories and memories of DC residents as communities experience change and residents age. The initiative makes existing oral history recordings more accessible and gives residents the training and…

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Design Inspiration from the Archives

March 13 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm EDT
Newseum, 555 Pennsylavania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001 United States
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Free

This workshop is designed to spark creative re-use of historical material. The collections are a goldmine for design inspiration. In this workshop, attendees will gain inspiration from collections ranging from Victorian dance cards to mid-century modern government docs, punk rock posters to 1940s restaurant menus, gold-inlaid bindings to mod fashions. Let the typography and ornament inspire your next creative project! Access to the reading room is via the Newseum’s Group Entrance on C Street (enter via C Street Group Entrance between 5th & 6th…

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The Watergate: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address

March 26 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm EDT
National Building Museum, 401 F Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20001 United States
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Hear how Italian architect Luigi Moretti promised to bring a “touch of Rome” to America’s capital city with the design of the Watergate complex. Author Joseph Rodota tells its story, which features a remarkable cast of characters, from Monica Lewinsky and Senator Bob Dole to Martha Mitchell and Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Learn how this famous building, which the Washington Post once called “a glittering Potomac Titanic,” became synonymous with scandal. $12 Member | $10 Student | $20 Non-member Tickets are non-refundable…

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Community Policing in the Nation’s Capital

March 31, 2018 - January 15, 2019
National Building Museum, 401 F Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20001 United States
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  THE PILOT DISTRICT PROJECT, 1968-1973 OPENS MARCH 31, 2018 In 1968, the eyes of a troubled nation were focused on Washington, D.C. After the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the ensuing widespread neighborhood destruction that followed in the District and nationwide, what would come next? Would D.C.’s political and community leaders rise to the occasion? A new exhibition organized in partnership with the National Building Museum as part of a city-wide commemoration of the…

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