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November 2017

For the Record: Picturing D.C.

November 9, 2017 - March 4, 2018
George Washington University Museum | The Textile Museum, 701 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052 United States
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November  9, 2017 – March 2018 George Washington University Museum|The Textile Museum For the Record: Picturing D.C. is a juried exhibit of 44 original artworks by 25 local artists who have focused on neighborhoods in each of Washington, D.C.’s eight wards. These two-dimensional artworks, created between 1988 and 2017, offer the artists’ interpretations of Howard Town/Pleasant Plains, Burleith, Palisades, Shepherd Park, Ivy City, Buzzard Point, Kenilworth, or Congress Heights. Since its founding in 1894, the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. has…

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January 2018

Saturday Research Hours

January 27 @ 10:00 am - 2:00 pm EST
Newseum, 555 Pennsylavania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001 United States

Research appointments in the Kiplinger Research Library are available by prior appointment between 10am and 1:45pm. Please email library@dchistory.org with your requested arrival time and the object IDs from the catalog of the material you would like to have access to. If requesting material from the DCPL collections currently co-located with the Historical Society, please send that request to wash.dcpl@dc.gov or 202-727-1213, again noting your requested arrival time and the material you would like to have access to.

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February 2018

Lecture: Slaves, Students, and the 1847 Expulsion Riot at GW

February 5 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm EST
George Washington University Museum | The Textile Museum, 701 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052 United States

Phillip Troutman, assistant professor, George Washington University Writing and History departments Phillip Troutman presents new research on the history of slavery at Columbian College—then a Baptist college, now George Washington University. Troutman focuses on an 1847 case in which Abram, a young man enslaved by the college steward, attempted to sue for his freedom. Abram was aided by Henry Arnold, a college junior who was expelled for his actions, creating a scandal in the Baptist press. This program is part…

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Frederick Douglass at 200

February 7 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm EST
Maryland Historical Society, 201 West Monument St.
Baltimore, MD 21201 United States
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Frederick Douglass at 200 6:30 PM, FREE program, light reception to follow Presented by: David Blight, Ph.D. at the Maryland Historical Society David Blight is currently writing a new, full biography of Frederick Douglass that will be published by Simon and Schuster in September 2018, titled Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom. This lecture will focus on the meaning of Douglass’s life and thought, as well as the importance of writing his biography, especially in light of the commemoration of his…

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Intro to House History

February 13 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm EST
Newseum, 555 Pennsylavania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001 United States
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Free

This workshop is an introduction to resources about the history of houses and other buildings in Washington, D.C. The workshop provides attendees with an opportunity to learn about the information in microfilm resources (including city directories and tax assessment records), digital resources (such as the building permits database and related History Quest platform), and real estate atlases. Access to the reading room is via the Newseum’s Group Entrance on C Street (enter via C Street Group Entrance between 5th & 6th…

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Lecture: Lisner Auditorium and Racial Justice in D.C.

February 26 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm EST
George Washington University Museum | The Textile Museum, 701 21st St NW
Washington, DC 20052 United States

Michael Tune, PhD candidate, George Washington University Department of History; Gayle Wald, professor, George Washington University Department of English Though recognized today as a site of racial progressivism, the story of Lisner Auditorium is one of foot-dragging and institutional reticence, not progressive action. Join graduate student Michael Tune and Professor Gayle Wald in this historical exploration of GW’s largest public venue. This program is part of the D.C. Mondays at the Museum series inspired by the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana…

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